Post

Aug 25
Jenkins Install

In this tutorial, we will walk through the download instalation of Jenkins to prepare our Continuous Integration setup. So far, we have installed the Java Development Kit, Maven, and Eclipse. Now we will install Jenkins. Next we will Git, and connect to Jenkins to fire off new builds on Commit.

 

While there isn't much to the Jenkins installation, installing and configuring the plugins is where things will get interesting.

 

  1. Navigate to the Jenkins download page: https://jenkins.io/download
  2. Scroll down to the latest version of Jenkins, and click on the latest version for your OS

  3. Locate the Jenkins zip file in your downloads folder
  4. Open the Jenkins zip file and launch the Setup Wizard (jenkins.exe), and follow the instructions

  5. Once the install has completed, click Finish


    It's as simple as that. As we say in the industry: "Bing bang boom" … you have successfully installed Jenkins!

     

     

     

     

     

     

Aug 23
Simple Echo App in Eclipse with TDD

In this tutorial, we will walk through creating a basic JUnit test class in Eclipse just to make sure that our environment is set up properly. We will use Test Driven Development (AKA Test First Development) to ensure that we are writing just enough code to pass our test, and not writing our test to pass our code. This process can be used to test and confirm that you are getting the correct output from your code.

We will create a single Junit test method, review the various dependancies, and confirm that there are 0 errors in your code. Using this process can help to save time & energy that may otherwise be expended on reviewing and re-writing code that doesn't work.

 

First we will create a new Java project, then we will create a JUnit test that describes the functionality that we expect from our code. In addition, we will use code generation tools in Eclipse (templates) to create the class and it's contained methods. Lets get started!

 

  1. On the File menu, select: New > Java Project
  2. Name the Project EchoApp, and click Finish
  3. Expand the EchoApp project
  4. Right click on the src folder
  5. On the popup menu select: New > Class

  6. Name your new class TestEcho, and accept all defaults by clicking Finish

  7. Type the following code into your project (Notice the red squigglies beneath some of your annotations)

  8. Hover over the @Test annotation with the red squiggly beneath it
  9. Select "Add JUnit 4 library to the build path" to make the red squiggly disappear
  10. Hover over the assertEquals annotation
  11. Select Add static import 'org.junit.Assert*' to add the assert import and make the red squiggly go away

  12. Hover your mouse over Echo and select Create class 'Echo' to create the Echo class and make the red squiggly disappear

  13. Accept default settings and click Finish


    An empty public class has now been created:

  14. Click on the TestEcho.java tab to return to your class (Notice that now, a red squiggly is beneath echo)
  15. Hover over echo, and you will see '1 quick fix available:'
  16. Select Create method 'echo(String)' in type 'Echo' to create a Public Static String method

  17. Right click on the @Test annotation, select Run as > 1 Junit Test

  18. Eclipse will prompt you to save your TestEcho and your new Echo class

  19. Click OK to save the files
  20. Uh oh! It looks like your test has failed L

  21. Click the Echo.java tab (Notice that the default method template has set the return value to null)

  22. Change null to expected
  23. Click the TestEcho.java tab to return to your test class
  24. Right click on the @Test annotation
  25. Select Run as > 1Junit test

  26. A dialogue box will appear that asks if you want to save your resources. Select OK

 

Your test will now run and pass with 0 errors and 0 failures:

 

 

 

It is 100% official… you are AWESOME! In this demo, we used a basic class and test class to ensure that the resources were properly installed.

 

Resources:

Java Development Kit

Maven

Eclipse

 

See the post on installing Jenkins to convert this simple Java Project to a Maven Project and build and test with Jenkins.

Aug 22
Installing Eclipse Oxygen on Windows 10
  1. Navigate to http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/eclipse-packages/
  2. In the Eclipse installer window select your OS from the dropdown menu
  3. Click 32 bit or 64 bit

  4. Click Download to download the Eclipse Windows installer
  5. Locate the Eclipse installer in your downloads folder, and double click the executable
  6. On the Start menu, select Eclipse Oxygen (recently added)
  7. When the Eclipse Launcher dialogue box appears, type C:\Demos as the Workspace path


  8. Close the Welcome window by clicking the X next to the Welcome tab in the upper left corner
  9. Now you can see the Package Explorer window

     

     

    See the next post Simple Echo App in Eclipse using TDD to verify your installion!

Aug 14
Install Maven
  1. Download the Binary zip archive from Apache Maven from http://maven.apache.org/download.cgi

  2. Locate Apache Maven zip file in downloads 
  3. Right click on the folder and choose Extract All

  4. Cut and paste Maven folder into your C drive 
  5. Rename the folder as Maven

     



  6. Once the installation is complete you will need to create an Environment Variable and add it to the Path system variable.
  7. On Windows 10 type System in the Start Menu and select System (Control Panel) not System Info.
     
  8. In the System dialog select Advanced System Settings in the menu on the left this will bring up the System Properties dialog.
  9. In the System Properties dialog select Environment Variables

  10. In the Environment Variables dialog select New in the System Variables section
  11. In the New Variable dialog enter MAVEN_HOME for the Variable Name and the path to your JDK installation as the Variable Value
  12. Click OK to save the changes to the new MAVEN_HOME system variable

  13. Repeat the Process to add an M2_HOME variable.
  14. In the Environment Variables dialog select the Path System variable in the System Variables section and click Edit.
  15. Add %MAVEN_HOME%\Bin to the end of the list
  16. Add %M2_HOME%\Bin to the next line and click OK

  17. Now that the M2_HOME has been installed and the Path System Variable has been updated we can verify the version of our installation from a command prompt.
  18. Launch a command window by typing CMD in the start menu
  19. At the command prompt type mvn -version end press Enter You should receive output similar to the image below:

 

  

Aug 13
Install Java Development Kit

To get started with Java Development and follow along with the ProDataMan Agile and DevOps samples and demos using Open Source tools you first need to download and install the Java Development Kit (JDK)

You can find the link to download the JDK for you environment here: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk8-downloads-2133151.html

Select your operating system and CPU type from the list. I am running Windows 10 on a x64 CPU

Once the download is complete launch the .exe to install the JDK.
Click Next, Next, Finish to complete the installation.

Once the installation is complete you will need to add an Environment Variable for the JDK and add it to the Path system variable.
On Windows 10 type System in the Start Menu and select System (Control Panel) not System Info.

In the System dialog select Advanced System Settings in the menu on the left this will bring up the System Properties dialog.
In the System Properties dialog select Environment Variables

In the Environment Variables dialog select New in the System Variables section
In the New Variable dialog enter JAVA_HOME for the Variable Name and the path to your JDK installation as the Variable Value

Click OK to save the changes to the new JAVA_HOME system variable.
In the Environment Variables dialog select the Path System variable in the System Variables section and click Edit.
Add %JAVA_HOME%\Bin to the end of the list and click OK

Now that the JDK has been installed and the Path System Variable has been updated we can verify the version of our installation from a command prompt.
Launch a command window by typing CMD in the start menu
At the command prompt type Java -version end press Enter
You should receive output similar to the image below.

Now we are ready to install Maven and Eclipse.

 

Jun 16
DevOps Key Metrics

What I find most compelling about the DevOps metrics listed below is the fact that control of almost all of the metrics can be gained by mastering the first metric in the list. The metric that seems to tame all others is the Number and Frequency of deployments / software releases. If we strive for the seemingly extreme goal of 10+ Deploys per Day the milestones that we much achieve to reach this goal end up covering all of the remaining metrics. For example, if we are able to deploy 10 times per day without losing or pissing off every single one of our customers we must have reduced the volume of defects, number and frequency of outages as well as cost of those outages. As the story goes in order to deploy 10 times a day most everything in the delivery pipeline needs to be automated therefore automated testing should reduce the Number of Defects and the cost associated with fixing them. By the same token if the deployment is automated the Number and Cost of Resources associated with deployment should be reduced. Lastly in order to deploy 10 times during a normal workday of 8 hours (480 minutes) our deployments must be done every 48 minutes. If we intend for our customers to actually use our solution the actual deployment must take significantly less than 48 minutes! As a result, Mean Time to Recovery and Mean Time to Change must go down as changes and fixes can go out in the next deployment within 48 minutes.

  • Number and frequency of software releases
  • Volume of defects
  • Time/cost per release
  • MTTR (Mean Time to Recover)
  • MTTC (Mean Time to Change)
  • Number and frequency of outages / performance issues
  • Revenue/profit impact of outages / performance issues
  • Number and cost of resources
May 04
Configuration Management Tools

Configuration Tools.png

Mar 15
Get the Phoenix Project on Audible

Absolutely my favorite DevOps book!  If you are wondering what DevOps is or what problems it solves or how implementation might look in your organization the Phonix Project is for you.  Not like most IT books I have read this book is more like a Novel it reads like a good fiction I couldnt put it down!  I had to stay up late to see what Sara was going to mess up next with her unauthorized IT projects.

A great follow up to the Phoenix Project is the DevOps Handbook.

​​​      
If you dont have an Audible account already use the link below to get both books for free!!​​



Feb 03
Go To Training vs. Zoom

​Doing Webinars and Virtual Classroom training requires a tool with a few key features to get the job done correctly.  Finding a tool that has the necessary features and a price point that allows you to remain (or become) profitable can be a challenge.
So to that end we at ProDataMan are evaluating www​.GoToTraining.com and www.Zoom.com to determine which fulfills our current virtual training needs. I have a few clients and colleagues that use either​ Zoom or GoToTraining and have heard their feedback so now we are casting a wider net.
Is your team using one of these tools? Which is your favorite? Have you attended a webinar or virtual training using one of these tools? Which is better from an attendee perspective?
Any insight or feedback is greatly appreciated.



Dec 23
FREE Webinar - What is DevOps

What is DevOps?

Free Webinar starting at 12/23/2016 2:45 PM 
Attend our live recording session or view the completed recording at your leisure...

Please the Webinar Recording Session:
https://attendee.gototraining.com/r/1312800770419621121​


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